Heightened Possibility Of Self-Harm In Rheumatic Disease Patients

Rheumatology Diseases
Rheumatology Diseases
Rheumatology Diseases
Rheumatology Diseases

The self-harm rates of people who have some rheumatology diseases, especially fibromyalgia, are greater, as per the Clinical Practice Research Datalink’s information. According to the University of Keele’s James Prior and his investigator colleagues, medical professionals have to know this possibility and give the right management. The researchers say this after they discovered that the year-over-year incidence rates between 2000 and 2016 have stayed rather consistent.

They looked at data concerning people diagnosed with fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis from 1990 to 2016. The information pertained to 410,384 osteoarthritis patients, 23,205 rheumatology arthritis patients, 10,484 ankylosing spondylitis sufferers, and 17,546 individuals with fibromyalgia. Those fibromyalgia patients had the greatest self-harm rate, whereas the individuals with osteoarthritis saw the least incidence over the years.

The researchers discovered that people who had every aforementioned health condition save ankylosing spondylitis were more likely to deliberately inflict harm on themselves. They adjusted for many variables, which include age, smoking status, sex, alcohol usage, anxiety, mental depression, and body mass index. After that, they found a considerable decline in the self-harm risk among both fibromyalgia patients and rheumatoid arthritis sufferers.

They classified osteoarthritis patients by the disease duration, and then the self-harm possibility increased for people who had durations of between 1 and 4 years and 5 and 9 years. Anyhow, there was not any major connection to self-harm in the individuals who had the diseases for less than 12 months or 10 years and more.

Further analysis was done to discover how gender and age affect the likelihood of those people committing self-harm, and it demonstrated that both are ‘weak’ impact modifiers. This finding is now published in the journal named Arthritis Care and Research.

Considering the heightened risk among those diagnosed with rheumatology diseases, the researchers underline the requirement for medical interventions to lower this severe comorbidity. For an uninitiated, the term comorbidity implies an individual having more than one health condition at the same time. In this regard, it just refers to the fact that the increased self-harm likelihood and the aforementioned rheumatic diseases overlapped.

On the other hand, the word ‘intervention’ refers to a medical measure to make a health condition better. The conclusion of the researchers is this: “clinicians should be vigilant, explore mood, assess risk, and offer appropriate support and management, especially to patients with fibromyalgia.”

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